Review by Andy Martin for Morison Pill Vase by Airship Magic

Review by Andy Martin for Morison Pill Vase by Airship Magic
Review by Andy Martin for Morison Pill Vase by Airship Magic
4 out of 5

Since 2016, Mad Jake Jr. and his brother Frederick have been growing their company Airship Magic into a successful magic manufacturing and distribution company. Jake focuses mainly on the metal and coin work and Frederick on the wood work and turning. They also collaborate with smaller, and often unknown, craftsmen to bring a unique line of magic that you rarely find elsewhere in the industry. Their commitment to quality and innovation is high and I’ve been very happy with the products I have purchased from them directly and through Stevens Magic. Just browsing through their website you will find all sorts of cool items that you won’t find elsewhere.

This is a pretty version of this classic wood turning effect made by Frederick at Airship Magic with a snug fitting ball and shell.  It looks great and works well.  It is not as fine as Colin Rose’s work or Owen’s or Floyd Thayer’s  but that is also reflected in the price.

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Review by Andy Martin for It's Just Impossible (Deluxe) by N8 Quality Magic

Review by Andy Martin for It's Just Impossible (Deluxe) by N8 Quality Magic
Review by Andy Martin for It's Just Impossible (Deluxe) by N8 Quality Magic
4 out of 5

There is no doubt the title of this clever effect from N8 Quality Magic is very apt.  If you look at the test conditions that surround it, it does seem truly impossible for the chain to penetrate the bolt.  And amazingly everything can be minutely examined with no switches or magnets.

However, the downside is that this will take a little practice to get smooth – it is not difficult but it does take a knack.  If you put in a little time you will have an effect that is always ready to roll and will fool them for sure.

There are a few angle issues and this can only be performed with spectators in front of you.  Don’t get me wrong it is a clever method and I’m not sure you could ever figure it out if you didn’t watch the explanation video, but it will take some practice to get it smooth.

This is the Deluxe version made from Mahogany with a brass spike rather than the cheaper standard version with painted tube and wooden spike seen in the video.  They were made in limited quantities.

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Review by Andy Martin for The Palamedes Revelation (1 of 24) by Damir Djanis

Review by Andy Martin for The Palamedes Revelation (1 of 24) by Damir Djanis
Review by Andy Martin for The Palamedes Revelation (1 of 24) by Damir Djanis
4 out of 5

This is a great looking item produced in a limited edition of 24 units from the new craftsman Damir Djanis released by George Robinson at Viking Mfg. It uses a clever and unique mechanism which allows you to show any of 6 numbers on the die in the box.

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Review by Andy Martin for Simplicity Card Box (Blue) by Supreme Magic Company

Review by Andy Martin for Simplicity Card Box (Blue) by Supreme Magic Company
Review by Andy Martin for Simplicity Card Box (Blue) by Supreme Magic Company
4 out of 5

Supreme released this interesting little card box in yellow c. 1966 and released it again in blue c. 1977. There is little difference, apart from color, between the two though the lid fits on slightly differently. But the size and depth are the same. This is the later blue version.

The 2 pages of instructions come with a number of ideas. The key difference with this card box when compared with more standard ones is that there is a small recess in the bottom and the lid is not connected to the base. If you want to really examine the box, this box allows you to fairly easily ditch the flap and card.

However, my favorite idea based on the instructions is a no move approach and to use a sheet of newspaper (or other paper should work) and you can then can do a seamless switch with no moves or effort and even match a freely selected card in the box. This is how it goes:

  • Lay a sheet of newspaper down to secure the performance area.
  • Have a spectator shuffle and chose any card (no force) without looking at it and place the card face down on the newspaper.
  • Cover the card with the small box (to allow for an impression).
  • Lift the box up and have them retrieve their card.
  • Hand them the box and ask them to open the lid and compare the card in the box with their chosen card.
  • It matches.
  • The cards and the box are 100% clean and you didn’t do any moves.  I think this approach has some legs for sure.

Anyway, a different card box design that you don’t see very often that I know you need in your collection 🙂

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Review by Andy Martin for Make Your Choice bu Julio Montoro, Juan Capilla

Review by Andy Martin for Make Your Choice bu Julio Montoro, Juan Capilla
Review by Andy Martin for Make Your Choice bu Julio Montoro, Juan Capilla
4 out of 5

Although the ad copy for Make Your Choice doesn’t name the effect that it is a close-up version of, it is most likely Prestige, as they look basically the same to the audience, but use very different methods.  Make Your Choice works well and there is nothing to break or go wrong, but it does require a simple move whereas Prestige is automatic.  However, you need to have a little more distance to perform Prestige whereas you can be much closer with Make Your Choice. The gimmick for Prestige is a little more interesting and novel, but Make Your Choice still works fine as described.

In his review video David Dellman provides a useful product comparison of the two items. Thanks David!

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Review by Andy Martin for Ghost Glass (Ghost Card) by Jack Hughes

Review by Andy Martin for Ghost Glass (Ghost Card) by Jack Hughes
Review by Andy Martin for Ghost Glass (Ghost Card) by Jack Hughes
4 out of 5

This is another rare Jack Hughes classic and is a great way to finish Card Go.

It is a great idea, but I found this a little tricky to do smoothly but we’ll see how it looks in the video after I’ve had some more practice.  It could easily be the age of the unit (almost 80 years!).

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Review by Andy Martin for Mental Die by Milson, Tannen's, Paul Diamond, Unknown

Review by Andy Martin for Mental Die by Milson, Tannen's, Paul Diamond, Unknown
Review by Andy Martin for Mental Die by Milson, Tannen's, Paul Diamond, Unknown
4 out of 5

This Mental Die is well made with very fine tolerances, but has no frills and is stripped down to work perfectly every time.  It easy to do and comes with an extra effect in the instructions that most people miss called Spectral Control which is a great way of performing the effect with some extra magic instead of simply determining the top number on the die.

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Review by Andy Martin for Reserved B.S. (Billet Switch) by Koch Magic

Review by Andy Martin for Reserved B.S. (Billet Switch) by Koch Magic
Review by Andy Martin for Reserved B.S. (Billet Switch) by Koch Magic
4 out of 5

This is based upon Bob Ostin’s Dice Prediction c. 1953. And is quite similar to Nelson’s Mental Gimic. However, the difference between Bob Koch’s version and both the original and Nelson’s is that it uses gravity instead of a spring or rubber band.  This makes is less likely to break, but also means that it can make more of a sound and is less versatile. 

The unit is the most solid of all the versions I have seen and is very easy to switch out for other items such as billets, notes, and bills.

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Review by Andy Martin for Tapit (Tappit) by House of Enchantment, Royal V. Heath

Review by Andy Martin for Tapit (Tappit) by House of Enchantment, Royal V. Heath
Review by Andy Martin for Tapit (Tappit) by House of Enchantment, Royal V. Heath
4 out of 5

This is a remake of Heath’s Mystic Tappit  – not sure why Jay Leslie spelt “Tappit” incorrectly  when he released this but it should have two p’s.

This is a functional version and Jay has included an extra phase which works well too.  But to my mind it is not necessary and just repeating the standard effect two or three times in a row is really enough to blow their minds.  This is one of the few effects that gets better with repetition.  And unlike the original bakelite tiles these colors will not fade 🙂

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