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Devano Rising Cards (Blue) by Douglas-Wayne Illusioneering, George Richbark

(c. 1995) (Submit Review) (Submit Update)

Harry (or Mitch as he was also known) Devano from Scotland was a semi-pro close-up, mental and platform magician and he created his first Devano Rising cards deck in 1948.  The method has stood the test of time and one of the best versions you can purchase today is from George Richbark.  They were also made when George and Dave Dorsett were teamed together as Douglas-Wayne Illusioneering.  The block is only 15 cards thick and this is better than most other types of gimmicked deck I have seen, and allows the deck to be handled very freely.  It also uses pins instead of tape, which has always been my preferred contact system.

In Claude Klingsor’s amazing “The Big Book of Rising Cards” I was really pleased to see that Mr. Klingsor has this to say about the The Devano deck in the final Conclusion Page (201)

I think the best method for close-up is the Devano method (like Keith Bennett’s version) if you use a different way to make each card rise. The first card comes out of the pack which is held by the magician. The second one comes out of the pack; the second card being placed in its case. For the third one, the pack is placed into a glass. Al Goshman performed a very nice routine of that kind and Alfredo Marchese created a beautiful finale by adding the cards fountain to his routine.

And I whole wholeheartedly agree!

The video clip of Don Alan is amazing – talk about a beautiful routine. That is a true master at work! The Devano routine starts at 2:53 for those who can’t wait!

Effect: In this booklet, Ron Bauer does a step by step break down of Don Alan’s routine which is featured on the video above.  Don Alan is amazing – talk about a master at work and a beautiful routine.  The Devano routine starts at 2:53 for those who can’t wait!  But you would never guess the deck was gimmicked and Don is so casual and smooth with it.  What a perfect routine.

Ron Bauer also includes some interesting history about who made the Devano deck for Don Alan and why he was unhappy with the Tannen’s version at the time.  The man who made Don’s deck was Chicago Comedy Magician and MC Howard Bamman, and it had the perfect characteristics that Don was looking for (which sound similar to the decks George Richbark is still making today).

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Approx. Price: $37.50 (2002) ***

Notice: I am not a dealer and this item is not for sale on this site. It maybe available in the links below or at our sister site: qualitymagicsales.com, but not from here so please do not ask.
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2 reviews for Devano Rising Cards (Blue) by Douglas-Wayne Illusioneering, George Richbark

  1. Steve Thomas

    Richbark model of the Devano rising cards..

    This deck, while not cheap, is worth the money. You’ll never have to replace anything “sticky”…if you know what I mean. The gimmick has “pinpoint” accuracy. I recommend this deck for the performer.

  2. Andy Martin

    Harry Devano from Scotland was a semi-pro close-up, mental and platform magician and he created his first Devano Rising cards deck in 1948.  The method has stood the test of time and one of the best versions you can purchase today is from George Richbark.  They were also made when George and Dave Dorsett were teamed together as Douglas-Wayne Illusioneering.  The block is only 15 cards thick and this is better than most other types of gimmicked deck I have seen, and allows the deck to be handled very freely.  It also uses pins instead of tape, which has always been my preferred contact system.

    In Claude Klingsor’s amazing “The Big Book of Rising Cards” I was really pleased to see that Mr. Klingsor has this to say about the The Devano deck in the final Conclusion Page (201)

    I think the best method for close-up is the Devano method (like Keith Bennett’s version) if you use a different way to make each card rise. The first card comes out of the pack which is held by the magician. The second one comes out of the pack; the second card being placed in its case. For the third one, the pack is placed into a glass. Al Goshman performed a very nice routine of that kind and Alfredo Marchese created a beautiful finale by adding the cards fountain to his routine.

    And I whole wholeheartedly agree!

    The video clip of Don Alan is amazing – talk about a beautiful routine. That is a true master at work! The Devano routine starts at 2:53 for those who can’t wait!

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